Tag Archives: women writing

A Poem

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It’s a poem if the words can live without you.

If the allegory can make blinding light shine from tombs
awaken memories
breathe them back to – reality.

It’s a poem if,
there are possibilities for similies linking people
universally
from fallen walls to picket signs
drawing scents of lemons
shake hands of farm girls to vegetarians
likening poetry to biblical days
with your comrades
logging different chapters
forcing the community for just one night
to look
directly into the sun
That’s a poem.

from the poetry book, Pocket Honey, Wind & Hips

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my poetic contributions  

“Nikki Skies is a poetic warrior with style and honest energy. Powerful, vibrant, passionate and hypnotic expressions surrounds her forcing you to merge with her words.” Floyd Boykin Jr./CEO and Founder of SpokenVizions

PocketHoneyWindHips

“Nikki Skies is not a poet. Nikki Skies is a literary visionary. Painter of panoramic jazz sunsets, sonnets and dusty morsels of herstoric truth.” Anastacia Tolbert, Journalist/Cave Canem Fellow

Check it out for yourself!  Get a copy!

New Author Listing

Greetings All!

It is great to be included in a listing with other authors! Check it out:

Women of the African Diaspora

Black Female Authors

Get your copy of my new novel, The Town Dance, today!

Purchase an Autographed Copy!

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AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT: Avril Somerville “A Journey of Life on Purpose”

What is the motivation behind “A Journey of Life on Purpose”?

I wrote this book because I know that many women like myself- intellectually curious and multi-dimensional in their gifts, with a strong commitment to family and community – struggle with finding meaning beyond their roles. This book helps readers, especially women, to reassign and reclaim value in the intentionality of their actions and words in their relationships and communities through candid conversations in prose and poetry. It delves into the primacy of the creative space, insists on the transparency required for real-ationships with others, including ourselves, and communicates a quiet urgency for more empathy as well as a deliberate understanding of what lies beneath race and identity; that is, the very soul and spirit of a being.

Separately, I struggled with my own displacement and belonging as a Black woman citizen of two countries – United States of America, by naturalization, and Commonwealth of Dominica, by birth – while honoring all of who I am. Illuminating themes of self-actualization, or becoming, in the context of our relationships with the women in our lives – friends, mothers, and even children- through candid conversations presents a powerful platform for cutting through some of the morass of identification that comes from identifying solely along racial lines. This too, is an important narrative that I wanted to highlight in print.

I want you to think of your favorite chapter/section, how would that part of the book describe you as a writer?

My favorite part of this book is the section titled “My Sister, My Self”. This section lends power to yet another narrative about the women’s collective. The tapestry of our love and the fabric of us as womenfolk is already layered individually, but collectively, we are formidable. We are often the gatekeepers of our homes, whether we acknowledge it or not. We have the ability to sway opinions, change minds, and appeal to the empathy of others, even our adversaries. Culling that power among us is critical if we are to move forward even on a personal level, let alone on a much broader level, but first it requires transparency with ourselves and each other. It is in this process that we’ll find our own strength. In our sisters, we can find ourselves.

Continue reading AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT: Avril Somerville “A Journey of Life on Purpose”

When We Arrived presents: Easy Like Sunday a poem by Jaha Zainabu (video post)

“stories that come to me in the night from folks I don’t know
ain’t got nothing to do with me
except they know I know
how to get a prayer through
and a story straight” – Jaha Zainabu


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ps – When I thought to do this poetry series, the first two women that came into my mind were:
1) Jolivette “the poet warrior” Anderson-Douoning (find her posts in the 1st week of April)
and
2) Jaha Zainabu

poetry, in my world, is not complete without their voices. Jaha was not available to contribute to the series with an interview, etc BUT I found some of her work to share with you. You MUST know her. You have to hear these stories that come through her.