Tag Archives: women writers

a Note on Time (meeting me)

I came / black girl
Dark black girl
2nd generation city girl
Mama gave me all she knew from what was torn between rebellion and fear.
I know fried spam and boxed potatoes
hot nights with white sheets over fans
I know the aroma of lost time / depressed eyes that shame your sunshine
I know a dream deferred / every word
Every pebble on its beach
I’ve swam on it
Drowned myself in its waters more times than my fingers and toes
And I still have enough space on my back for you.

If you missed She Chronicles, She missed you

I keep a list of things that motivate me.  One of them is inspiring others past their fears and doubts.  Having just finished the final drafts to a play and working on a new novel, I needed lots of motivation!  In March, I decided to have guest writers in celebration of Women’s History Month.  I had guest blog spots for writers to contribute stories about or for women.  I called it She Chronicles and it was a huge success to me!

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How did I measure the success?  With the majority of my invites being accepted and the writers meeting their deadlines!  I reached out to writers I admire and follow on WordPress, Facebook, Google+ and from my personal life.  The stories ranged from historical recognition, domestic abuse, family dedications, sexual abuse to stories of continued strive.  The writers would submit their blogs with concluding words such as, “I hope people like it…”, “Tell me what you think first…”  I must admit, EVERY story touched me.  From insecurities to doubts to fearlessness to promise, I could relate to what was being said from the contributors.  The two things that also resonated with me were, only one man accepted the offer and no Caucasian women accepted.

I’ll use the word fear.  Because it was a doubt of this not being the right arena.  Why?  I’m not one to beat around the bush so… 1) because I am African American and 2) because I am a woman.  This presents the exact reason behind dedicating a month with the intent to honor women.  As far as the Caucasian women not responding in a positive light, we are more alike than different.  Let’s continue to create our own narrative to entail how our communications should be aligned for motherhood, the work place, how we are represented in the arts and most importantly how we are remembered in history or should I say, HERstory.

If you haven’t had time to read the blogs from March, grab a cup of coffee put on your favorite house coat, and enjoy She Chronicles 2015.

 

 

 

The Bhubezi Women – The Women Who Hold Up the World by Cheryl Penn

hatshepshutneedle Hatshepsut’s Needle

It’s really quite difficult to tell how/when/why the Revealing of the Bhubezi Women unfolded.  It’s equally problematic to tell how many there are, or their particular function in Holding up the World.  One fact is evidenced – they are all REAL historical figures, most of which have been misunderstood by history.  Bhubezi Women identified thus far: Magenta, Sienna (better known as Shahrazad), Mona Lisa, Hypatia, Hatshepsut, Empress  Zhangsun, Pandora and Cynisca.  In the secret Sof Omar caves, an intriguing stele was found with the following inscription:The Ones That Protect From:  The Conscious Life, External words, Pure Pain, False Dreams, Ones to travel to the deepest reaches of the psyche, A barrier on their behalf to the outside world, A Thousand Deaths, An Unfulfilled Life, Enantiodromia,  The Incorporeal Body, The destructive animus, Lost Instinct.

**THE INFORMATION that Ms. Penn shared with us on this blog is imperative to Women’s Herstory around the globe.  Continue reading The Bhubezi Women – The Women Who Hold Up the World by Cheryl Penn

Invisible She Chronicles

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All stories have the same components for a structurally sound composition, (1) the setting (2) character (3) event (4) development (5) climax (6) and ending.  At least this is the formula that most educators pass on to writers to be better equipped to paint words on canvass.  All of these components are important but the most important for the audience is the ability to connect with the main character.  The objective is to make sure the audience cares what happens to this person the duration of the story. 
Continue reading Invisible She Chronicles