Tag Archives: women poets

fear wrestling

The merlot on my tongue
won’t allow me to speak.

I stain my pillow with attached prayers of something
better
betwixt the Ghana of my mane.

Afraid,
I walk with a cane looped to my belt to beat a fall
design distance from cerebral lessons

fear wrestling.
I wear tight shoes to ensure carefully calculated steps
abandon spontaneity
and disavow chances and dances with love.

taken from the book:

PocketHoneyWindHips

Get your autographed copy here

 

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SHE CHRONICLES: “Story #2,262,017” by Alice The Poet

SHE CHRONICLES: “Story #2,122,017” by Alice The Poet

Story #2,122,017, Week 6 Reflection – So earlier this week I have a conversation with a man who tells me that I am “not like other African American women.” What does that even mean? I’m hardworking, focused, loving. I’m navigating this life, working at balance (keeping God first and joy close). We only share positive things in our conversation. Why does that make me different? I see it as just another form of disunity. Unfortunately for some, there is a distinction (with hierarchy) between “types” of Black women globally; the African American woman being lowest on the ladder. Malcolm X specifically pointed out the Black woman in America (the African American woman) as being the most “disrespected … unprotected [and] neglected.” It is demonstrated not just in our portrayal, but also in our treatment. With his back-handed compliment, this Black man from Liberia demonstrates the sad reality of one of colonialism’s greatest and far-reaching tools, the practice of divide and conquer. I am thinking of wise, powerful, beautiful, kind and caring women like my grandmother-ancestors, my mother, my aunts, my sisters, my cousins, my friends, my colleagues and co-workers, all of the African American women I am like and those I strive to be more like (Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Ida B. Wells, Mary McLeod Bethune, Lucille Times, Zora Neale Hurston, Clarice Brown, Coretta Scott-King, Oprah, Betty Shabazz, Michelle Obama, Sonia Sanchez, Assata Shakur, Angela Davis, and so many more) as I respond, “That’s not true! I’m just like African American women and proud of it!” 
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Alice The Poet (Alice Nicholas) is a PhD student in the Department of Africology and African American Studies at Temple University. Her research interests include Black Diasporic literature, Black literary theory, Black love and Black liberation. She has presented papers and research at national conferences and cultural festivals. Her articles, essays, poetry and other writings have been published in both scholarly and artistic publications including African American Review, Encyclopedia of African Cultural Heritage in North America, Imhotep and the Zora Neale Hurston Society.  In 1999, she created the10 Million Stories series (collections of poetry, short stories and essays) as a demonstration of self-discipline, self-definition and self-publication. She is currently completing volume 9.
Contact: AliceThePoet@yahoo.com or

SHE CHRONICLES: Video Post, Jaha Zainabu

“Stories that come to me in the middle of the night from folks I don’t know.  Don’t have nothing to do with me except they know I know how to get a pray through and a story straight.”

SHE CHRONICLES: “I Am” by Susan “Spit-Fire” Lively

I am…
grace and beauty sublime,
love and life refined;
one with body, heart, and mind.

I am…
triumph over great odds.
I am all the love there ever was;
every good thing ever done.

I am …
the sex and passion and heat,
in every man’s dreams;
soon you’ll know what I mean.

I am…
civic obligation,
motherly negotiation,
and wifely adoration.

I am…
an intellect so sharp and keen,
truly the toughest player on the scene;
with thoughts so crisp and new and deep.

I am…
strength and honor and pride.
I am the light emanating inside.
I am what it means to truly be alive.
I am woman…

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SHE CHRONICLES: “Nana, Mother, Love” by Susan “Spit-Fire” Lively

When I think of you, my Nana, I think of…
nature’s smiling spring blooms,
good food cooking in a warm room,
life over-flowing from floor to rafters,
the things that I’ll recall forever after.
Because when I think of you, my Nana,
I think of family, joy, and laughter.
You see, I was the precious clay in your hands,
and you gave me the best gift when you said
that I had your heart.
When you died, I felt my world come apart.
A woman unlike any other,
for there could never be another,
like the lady who taught me
how to live, how to love – Nana, Mother, Love
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Susan “Spit-Fire” Lively is a poet, spoken word artist, producer, photographer, educator, and activist from Belleville, IL. Co-organizer of “100,000 Poets & Musicians for Change – St. Louis” since its inception in 2011; Susan also produces the series’ “First Bloom” and “Women For Peace”, and co-produces the “Dia de los Muertos Fiesta”.  In 2016 she became an Officer of Urb Arts’ Executive Board. In January of 2017 Susan produced the St. Louis leg of the international event “Poets & Musicians Against Trump” (with co-producer John Blair).

Lively’s been featured on “Literature For The Halibut”, “The Arts with Nancy Kranzberg”, the “Healthy Living Program” and PBS’ “Living St. Louis”. She has taught spoken word and creative writing at Confluence Academy, Foster and Adoptive Care Coalition, and for the Nine Network and St. Louis Fringe. Susan’s work has been published in “Static Movement”, “Postcard Shorts”, “Head To Hand”, “The East St. Louis Monitor”, “The PEN”, “Chance Operations”, “Drumvoices Revue 20th Anniversary Edition”, “SIUE News”, “Big Bridge“, “No Vacancyand the social justice anthology “Crossing the Divide“.

https://www.facebook.com/#!/SPITFIRE365
Instagram.com/Susan_SpitFire_Lively