Tag Archives: black women writers

Winter Reading Request ‘-)

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This is that novel I wrote in 2015. While I am elated to be sharing my latest novel later this year… if you don’t have this in your library, click on the link and get your copy:

The Town Dance

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Celebrating Zora!

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It’s not too late to join the annual festivities in the name of the literary icon, Zora Neale Hurston:

https://zorafestival.org/

What Are The ZORA!™ Festival’s Goals ?
  • To celebrate the life and work of Zora Neale Hurston
  • To celebrate the historic significance of Eatonville
  • To celebrate the cultural contributions which people of African ancestry have made to the United States and to world culture

Happy Birthday Zora Neal Hurston!

Re-membering an amazing writer, an iconic contributor to American literature,

Zora Neale Hurston

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Hurston’s works touched on the African-American experience and her struggles as an African-American woman. Her novels went relatively unrecognized by the literary world for decades, but interest revived after author Alice Walker. Her most infamous work is, “Their Eyes Were Watching God”.

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Happy Birthday Tananarive Due!

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I was introduced to her work during a book club I was a part of when I lived in Los Angeles years ago. The book was, “My Soul To Keep” –

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First of all, even with all my theatre and poetry literature knowledge, I did not know of any black women that wrote in this genre. So not only was the book AMAZING, I was intrigued that our storytelling entailed this! I credit Due with broadening my curiosity on this genre and re-thinking/re-reading Octavia Butler. I had only read Butler’s “Kindred” at the time but now I dug deeper into both of their works. Thank you Tananarive Due!

Do yourself a favor… make sure these titles are in your library…

My favorite?

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HANDS DOWN!!! Like Butler, Due is probably writing before her time (for us right on time) and later down the line her work will be considered for more television/film production. Until then, Happy Birthday and we honor you!

Loving moments from the book, “Letter To My Daughter”

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“In an unfamiliar culture, it is wise to offer no innovations, no suggestions, or lessons. The epitome of sophistication is utter simplicity.” Maya Angelou

“My soul should always look back and wonder at the mountains I had climbed and the rivers I had forged and the challenges which still await down the road. I am strengthened by that knowledge.” Maya Angelou

When she was once being “timidly attacked” by a Hollywood producer who was interested in developing one of her short stories into a television show: “I promise you, you do not want me as your adversary because, once I feel myself under threat, I fight to win, and in that case I will forget that I am thirty years older than you, with a reputation for being passionate.” Maya Angelou

she continued in this chapter:

“I am never proud to participate in violence, yet, I know that each of us must care enough for ourselves, that we can be ready and able to come to our own defense when and wherever needed.” Maya Angelou

“Racism still rages behind many smiling faces, and women are still spoken of in some circles, as conveniently pretty vessels. Macon, Georgia is down south, New York City is up south. Blithering ignorance can be found wherever you choose to live.” Maya Angelou

“Southern themes will range from generous and luscious love to cruel and bitter hate, but no one can ever claim that the South is petty or indifferent. [In the south] black people walk with an air which implies “when I walk in, they may like me or dislike me, but everybody knows I’m here.” Maya Angelou

renewed / not new – a Brown Girls Privilege

here is some of my privilege.

I believe they were thinking of me

wearing myrrh and adorned in silver

and that is not selfish

we share the same sun

– the kiss on our skin

we share a love of puzzles

– arrangements of letters

we turn into poems – plays – books – speeches

and laughs.

literary legends

Black Folks Don’t Like Clowns

I won’t smile just because /
I’m not a clown.
We know better than walking with the flow of traffic
or to love without love
Demand a song for your shadow
garlic for your shoes / protect your trail
but saltwater the pattern
that only the shake of bones can re-assemble
this isn’t magic
but the perfect mixture of spirits
to parch abandoned trains traveling
and quench prayers pressed in family bibles.
 
There is no big top coming / No elephant tricks
 
So, from which rain do you belong?
who organized this parade?
with borrowed drum beats
something isn’t right…
we don’t play piccolo’s where I come from
 
And some will need to pay
especially if we don’t see the receipt or
experience you as a whole person
with a moon eclipsed hip
and patched spare tire
 
You want to stop crying?
Stop smiling for no reason.
besides
 
Black folks don’t like clowns
anyway. –
 
“Black Folks Don’t Like Clowns” from the book “yardwork