Tag Archives: #black women authors

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Happy Birthday Gloria Naylor!

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Gloria Naylor wrote one of my favorite books, “The Women of Brewster Place”. I probably consider it one of my favorites because it is full of women characters, colorful characters I could draw monologues from.

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Naylor’s debut novel, The Women of Brewster Place, was published in 1982 and won the 1983 National Book Award in the category First Novel.[5] It was adapted as a 1989 television miniseries of the same name by Oprah Winfrey‘s Harpo Productions.

Naylor’s work is featured in such anthologies as Breaking Ice: An Anthology of Contemporary African-American Fiction (ed. Terry McMillan, 1990), Calling the Wind: Twentieth-Century African-American Short Stories (ed. Clarence Major, 1992) and Daughters of Africa (ed. Margaret Busby, 1992).

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Thank you for such amazing literature! Happy birthday and we remember you!

An Act of Interruption

All along I have been doing work that interrupted the silencing of black women in his-story. This his-story includes the actual absence of her presence or her presence represented in vilified images or characteristics. Effortlessly, even through the pen strokes of black people, black women characterizations are resembling or in actuality that of the socially oppressive jezebel, tragic mulatto or big mama. Until going in to studies for Africana Women’s Studies, I didn’t have the language of what I was doing nor did I have the connections of other women that have doing this work for years.

My last novel, The Town Dance, I was inserting the silent voice of people who were victims to same gender sexual assault. The novel was my support for a dear friend who had been sexually assaulted by her girlfriend and dismissed the encounter with an uncomfortable laugh. I’ll never forget her looking at me, forcing a smile then saying, “she’s strong”. This was over 15 years ago. When I finally decided to write the novel, my internet search on the topic led me to pornographic sites or inconclusive court hearings. The writing process was therapy for me. Even though I have a community of gay friends, both men and women, I was terrified to be plagued with being considered “gay” if I wrote the book. Actual terror would travel my body as I imagined people staring at me questioning if I was a gay women. I had to confront my homophobia and fears, have confronting, vulnerable conversations with friends and then heal. Afterwards, I wrote the book.

A project that has been in my head for years comes from visits to Montgomery, Alabama and one of their historic sites from the civil rights movement. This relatively flat land, small city was once a huge mobilizing force for progressive efforts of black people. The communities that once flourished are now abandoned and its buildings dilapidated. But the stories live on.

The stories of the brave men that faced, often times, violent resistance in their fight against Jim Crow. As always, I wondered what the women were doing. The beautiful black and white photos that display their wrinkle-free dresses and unstained white or pastel colored gloves gave them a physical presence. But the texts were absent of their words, their actions. So I began research and found women that I felt needed to be given voice. After years of imagining their world, visiting Montgomery and sitting in my car in the neighborhood I wanted to focus on, the book is slated be released October of 2019. My first take at historical fiction. I love this book and so excited to share it with the world in the upcoming months.

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Happy Birthday Tananarive Due!

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I was introduced to her work during a book club I was a part of when I lived in Los Angeles years ago. The book was, “My Soul To Keep” –

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First of all, even with all my theatre and poetry literature knowledge, I did not know of any black women that wrote in this genre. So not only was the book AMAZING, I was intrigued that our storytelling entailed this! I credit Due with broadening my curiosity on this genre and re-thinking/re-reading Octavia Butler. I had only read Butler’s “Kindred” at the time but now I dug deeper into both of their works. Thank you Tananarive Due!

Do yourself a favor… make sure these titles are in your library…

My favorite?

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HANDS DOWN!!! Like Butler, Due is probably writing before her time (for us right on time) and later down the line her work will be considered for more television/film production. Until then, Happy Birthday and we honor you!