Category Archives: women writers

Need that extra push? Women writers, this is for you!

Writing is such a lone sport.  We sit hours upon hours crafting story arcs and developing characters.  If you are an established woman writer living in Atlanta and are currently working on a project, this is for you!  We all need that extra push and encouragement and this writing group, “On The Shoulders of Greats” will do just that.  For more information click here.

SHE CHRONICLES: “Story #2,262,017” by Alice The Poet

SHE CHRONICLES: “Crooked Room” by Dessie Sanders

Welcome
DISCOVER MORE HERE
Black Women’s Crooked Room Collection

Museum Hours:
Tuesday – Thursday 10am-9pm
Friday – Saturday     10am – 6pm
Sunday –  Closed for praise and worship services
Monday –  Closed to the public

General Admission is free

Explore Black Women’s Crooked Room Collection your way.
Over 400 hundred years of creativity at your fingertips!
Download the BWCRC app for free.

No food and beverages allowed in the galleries, please.
Nada comida y refrescos permitidas en las galerias, por favor.

There,
I think I’ve covered the masses.

Behold our collection of African females of The Middle Passage:
Mapping Women’s Lives
Much attention is given to: their vulnerabilities, survival and resistance
They were the revolt, like Hives.

Enjoy your visit.
But first, we want to make sure that
You understand the Crooked Room guidelines.

Warning!

@ Times you will have to tilt or bend.
You will be placed in a crooked room and forced to sit in a crooked chair
And align with the distorted images of Black women on the wall.
Careful, don’t fall.

There are miles of galleries to explore
So, I hope you brought your walking shoes
All galleries are wheelchair friendly.

Black women don’t expect you to understand
How the Crooked Room has become grand
Give it time

Too much?

Come back today, tomorrow, or another day.
If not, stay
Spend time with the images that captures your eye.
Warning!
Some of the collections will make you cry.

Hungry?

You may eat in the kitchen where we use to eat.
It’s only fair; you have to play by the rules.
Sorry, but once upon a time,
Black people didn’t have the right to choose.

STOP!

Feel free to look but not touch
All works of art in the BWCRC are fragile.
Keep a safe distance; at least three feet.

Want to know more information about the Crooked Room?
Just ask any Black female
For their story, they’ll tale.

Again, welcome to the Crooked Room.

dessie1

At age 15, Dr. Dessie Mae Sanders was living in a low income
neighborhood located in South Dallas with two parents and three siblings. Her life was overwhelmed by streets that were surrounded by violence, drugs and prostitution. While attending Lincoln High School and Humanities Magnet, in South Dallas, Dr. Sanders found her passion in The Fine and Performing Arts. She was a strong participant and Alto Choir Leader of the Marine F. Bailey Concert Choir, 1985 – 1988, under the Direction of Evelyn B. Hamilton, and Theater, under the Direction of Dr. Louie H. White.

Today, Dr. Sanders is an outspoken, accomplished author, Educator, Playwright, and
Poet. She is the CEO & Founder of HBCU Connection and The Michelle Obama
International Academy of Arts and Humanities. She has an honorary Doctorate in
Theocentric Humanities, and is currently a Doctoral Candidate, (ABD)-Ph.D. in
Literature, at the University of Texas at Dallas. Also, has a Master’s degree in Liberal Studies, Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Arts in Theater from Grambling State University. Dr. Sanders is a professor of African American Identity and Womanism. As a scholar,her research re-imagines the religious nature within Africa and African-American women, the middle passage, antebellum slavery, and popular culture through stories told.

Sanders authored two books: Speechifying: This is the True Womanist Story, Paperback –August 7, 2013; and Bitter Black Female is an Over-Exaggerated SubCategory,
Paperback – July 20, 2015. Her earlier works include Fatbacks & Collard
Greens. A gospel play about Black family life coupled with the Black church. The play was critiqued in, Sandra M. Mayo’s and Elvin Holt’s. Stages of Struggle and
Celebration: A Production History of Black Theater in Theater, 2016. Fatbacks &
Collard Greens is now on (Video) with the Black Academy of Arts & Letters, GRIOT
Productions Season 37, at the University of North Texas Library. Her recent poem “59
Mirror Stage” was published by Eber & Wein Publishing, September 26, 2016. It was
featured at the Dallas Museum of Art’s Jazz Night, June 10, 2015.

SHE CHRONICLES, and so we begin

She Chronicles celebrates the feminine narrative through showcasing Her unique vernacular in literary contributions.  “Women writing about other women responsibly.”

People think this is not a big message, women writing responsibly about other women.  If so, the majority of female stage, screen and television actors would not be placed in story lines primarily due to their relation with children and/or their husbands/boyfriends.  We would have more stories that detail a developed protagonist and her achievements.   There are TONS of stories that have a lead male who has a mission/goal that he goes after ambitiously and then at night returns home to his wife and children or his girlfriend.  This is the massive norm.  The feminine narrative has been bent into shapes over so many years that it is literally unrecognizable.  Her voice sits so politely on the couch or hangs so nicely creased in the closet it appears comfortable and satisfied.  It is not.

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Continue reading SHE CHRONICLES, and so we begin

Keeping My Nose This Time

       “It is not enough to be a woman writer. It is imperative that we are women writers who write about other women, responsibly.  Otherwise, we’ll continue to write rebuttals on misrepresentation or the utter absence of our literary presence.”

Recently I returned to the city that grew my art, Los Angeles, California.  It is not the city I was born and reared in, however; it is the city that I consider home.  Where I grew into a woman and an artist.

Not expecting anyone to write my story, a few years back I had the audacity to write a piece of Los Angeles poetry HERstory that was not talked about.  What prompts this post is, during my recent visit to Los Angeles when I spoke about this information in front of a crowd, I was asked to be mindful and tell the “whole story” of LA women in poetry.  Interestingly enough, I’ve never seen the “whole story” written by my male comrades nor during my visit did I hear any conversations that announced the “whole story” of women in poetry.  The four day span I was in Los Angeles, when “the good ‘ole days” conversations came up, there was a repeated rundown of the male figures that were prominent in the foundational game but the women were harmoniously absent from the listings.

Continue reading Keeping My Nose This Time

Has It Really Been 10 Years? Ok, especially for today…

Ten years ago today I released my first book, “Mississippi Window Cracks”.  Wow!

Mississippi Window Crack

I literally drafted the book after spending a few days visiting a friend in Jackson, Mississippi.  From the energy of the historical places to the scent of the zesty magnolia trees to the delicious southern cuisine… I had a lot to write about!

“Mississippi Window Cracks” is a collection of six short stories and three prose pieces.  Here is a breakdown of the book:

The Untimely Flight – A story of two women with a chance meeting in the airport traveling to different locations.  One is on a business trip and the other reuniting with her family after abandoning them to follow her dreams some ten years prior.  Their meeting is purposeful yet brief. Just as life would have it.

The Auction – “For Mothers of wombs that drum life and dance the promise of tomorrow, I pour this libation.  For the victories of liberation and paths of freedom you laid before me, I walk today for you.”  As a child, one of Angel’s childhood stories told by her grandmother was that of Hathor and Tehuti.  An ancient Egyptian story told about the Goddess of beauty and the messenger of wisdom.  It has been whispered that the legendary Odu family in Mississippi carries the spirit of these deities, Angel and her brother Country.  She is here to persuade her brother to come home to his god-like self and maintain the balance in the world.

Return to Ruins – A prose piece in reference to the slave plantation called, The Windsor Ruins.

Summer Love – A steamy love story about a young woman working as an intern in Yazoo City, Mississippi.  She falls hard for a local radio DJ who spins more for her than the hottest tunes.

A Prose for Medgar and Myrlie – “Her bladder was full of miles like her mother’s.  She watered the ground with chocolate auburn.  The spices enticed the clouds to cry and capture the streets. She met him where the sun sat in the fire pit.  Her kissed her hand to summons a feather so she wouldn’t doubt his words.  His eyes were complete like the turn of an owl’s head.  Her fears poured from her spine like pureed apples.  The preacher announced their commitment where roads met corners with mirrors.  He hung their picture in a birdcage to catch time.  He told them not to be afraid.”

The Grass is Simply Green – Nia and LaDonna are best friends who have ventured lessons in life together.  Now, together they face reproductive injustice as one yearns to start a family.  Together they stand as long as one of them holds a secret from the other.

A Prose for Fannie Lou Hamer – “If you see her.  Tell her you remember.  Her protected skin that matched night.  Unafraid.  Sleep patterned to that of bats.  Called upon.  Like Nut and Shu.  To uphold the heavens.  Keep young mouths breathing.  When tempted to swallow swollen faith.  She followed the dust and escaped through vents.”

Southern Betrayal – The  story  of a woman scorned by love.  She travels to a voodoo/root shop to see if the potions really work as she seeks revenge on her ex-love.

When Chris Met Katrina – Hurricane Katrina devastated Louisiana and parts of Mississippi.  Like thousands of people who stayed to “wait this one out”, Chris does not evacuate his childhood home.  The storm passed as he suspected but the waters began to rise from the storm drains and flood the streets.  This is the day Chris met Katrina.

I suppose authors do something special when their books have anniversaries and what not :- /  so I am offering  autographed books  with FREE shipping of “Mississippi Window Cracks”. I only have a few sitting around my house.  I hope you enjoy it!